The Future of Legacy Admissions, and a Conversation with Esmeralda Santiago

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By Usa Express Daily


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The practice of legacy admissions—preferential consideration given to the children of alumni—has emerged as a national flash point since the Supreme Court ended affirmative action in June. Even some prominent Republicans agree with the Biden Administration that legacy preferences should end. The New Yorker contributor Jeannie Suk Gersen speaks with the dean of admissions at a university that just ended the practice. And David Remnick talks to the U.S. Education Secretary, Miguel Cardona, about the politics behind college admissions.

Plus, the novelist Esmeralda Santiago, whose latest book is “Las Madres,” speaks with the staff writer Vinson Cunningham about teaching herself to read and write again after a stroke.

Will the End of Affirmative Action Lead to the End of Legacy Admissions?

The U.S. Education Secretary, Miguel Cardona, and the New Yorker contributor Jeannie Suk Gersen on the movement to end legacy admissions—and the larger problem of equity in college acceptance.


The Novelist Esmeralda Santiago on Learning to Write After a Stroke

Santiago lost her ability to read and write after having a stroke, in 2008. She talks to the staff writer Vinson Cunningham about recovering and returning to her craft.


The New Yorker Radio Hour is a co-production of WNYC Studios and The New Yorker.



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